Hello, Lebanon. It’s me, your friendly Green Patriot. If you watched the news tonight, then you are aware that there is fresh water available for our use that could be accessed beneath the sea. For the record, we have known about this for years. However, we still insist on creating plans to import water from Turkey. If this works out, our dependence on foreign nations will increase, and the room we have to make independent decisions with will be reduced.

However, independently of state-level environmental decisions, we must be aware as to how to use our water wisely at home. My fellow Lebanese, this drought was predicted many years ago, and we have done nothing to safeguard ourselves against water over-use. As such, let us look at some of the ways that we can conserve water at home.

 

1. Check faucets and pipes for leaks

A small drip from a worn faucet washer can waste 20 gallons of water per day. Larger leaks can waste hundreds of gallons.

2. If it’s yellow, keep it mellow…

Every time you flush your toilet, five to seven gallons of water is wasted. Hence the environmentally-friendly phrase, “if it’s yellow keep it mellow, if it’s brown, flush it down.”

3.  Reduce the amount of time you spend in the shower. A four-minute shower uses approximately 20 to 40 gallons of water. 

4.  Install water-saving shower heads, toilets, and low-flow faucet aerators. It is even possible to buy water-saving laundry machines.

5. Turn off the water after you wet your toothbrush.

6. Use your dishwasher and clothes washer for only full loads.

Automatic dishwashers and clothes washers should be fully loaded for optimum water conservation. With clothes washers, avoid the permanent press cycle, which uses an added 20 liters (5 gallons) for the extra rinse. For partial loads, adjust water levels to match the size of the load.

7. When washing dishes by hand, don’t leave the water running for rinsing.

8. Don’t let the faucet run while you clean vegetables; just rinse them in a plugged sink or a pan of clean water. 

These small tips do make a large difference. Whenever I discuss water use with others, I often hear people saying “let other people do it before I do.” Or “the problem isn’t with us, it’s with the Syrian refugees.” My own personal favorite is “well, I’m leaving the country, so it doesn’t really matter!”

Water conservation is very important, regardless of wherever you are located. More importantly, your efforts to save water are unrelated to the efforts of your neighbors, friends, and political problems. The decision to fail to shut off the faucet while brushing one’s teeth is a very private one indeed, and does not require enormous political change before one starts doing it.  

Let us not hide behind our existing problems in order to avoid making any efforts to effect positive change. We can do it!!