Tag Archive: water conservation


Hello, Lebanon. It’s me, your friendly Green Patriot. The amount of rain we’ve been getting over the past few weeks has been interesting, to say the least. Lately, we’ve been getting a lot of rain, but I don’t think we will have that luxury for long. We are due for a serious water shortage by 2015.  

The amount of rain we’re getting…and the short arc of time during which we will have it…makes me think about rain harvesting all the more. For those unfamiliar with the term, rain harvesting is a method through which we can accumulate, treat, store, and later reuse rainwater. People do this to have more drinking water, water for livestock, water for irrigation, as well for menial things such as cleaning, etc. It can even supplement groundwater, and make a large difference in the amount of usable water available to us.

This is done in a very easy and inexpensive fashion. Rainwater is collected from the roofs of buildings, and it runs through an apparatus that cleans it and makes it appropriate for use. Household rainfall catchment systems are appropriate in areas with an average rainfall greater than 200 mm (7.9 in) per year. Lebanon is one such country. There are several different types of rain harvesting systems, depending on what you want them for. I have already posted a diagram in which the system is designed to increase the level of groundwater. Here is one sample design in which the rainwater would be used for your home purposes:

Obviously, this design would be adapted slightly for the purpose of an apartment building, but you get the idea. It would save you money on water, help the environment, and help us maximize our resources to the maximum. Let’s start thinking about conserving and using our natural resources wisely. We can do it, Lebanon!!

Hello, Lebanon. It’s me, your friendly Green Patriot. I’m sure you’ve all seen the environmental advocacy commercials on TV, stating that we should conserve water. They’re great! However, they do not discuss the facts about water, how we use it, and what we can do to conserve it.

My fellow Lebanese, water that we can use is a rare scarcity. Indeed, less than 2% of the Earth’s water supply is fresh water. Only 1% of the earth’s water is available for drinking water.  To make matters worse for us, a 2010 report from the Arab Forum for Environment and Development found that the Arab region will face water shortages as early as 2015. As such, it is time for us to find out about how we use water, and what we can do to conserve it. Did you know that on average, you use 140-170 gallons of water per day? The question is…how?

Showering and bathing alone make up 27% of indoor water use.  A ten minute shower requires 40 gallons of water!  A single flush of the toilet uses 6 ½ gallons of water. An average family of four uses 881 gallons of water per week just by flushing the toilet!

My fellow Lebanese, there is no doubt that we need water to service our needs. However, we waste a lot of it without noticing, and this has severe consequences. An average of 8% of all home water use is wasted through leaks. A leaky faucet can waste up to 100 gallons a day.  A leaking toilet can use 90,000 gallons of water in a month.

Fortunately, there are small things we can do that will make a huge difference. Turning off the water while you brush your teeth can save 4 gallons of water a minute. For a family of four, that’s roughly 200 gallons weekly.  Turning off the water while you shave can save more than 100 gallons of water a week. Fixing a leak can save 500 gallons of water each month.  Keeping the time you spend in the shower under 5 minutes can save up to 1000 gallons a month. Turning off water while shampooing and conditioning hair can save 50 gallons a week! Think about the differences these minute changes and the huge impact that they could have on your environment, home, and bills. After all, do you want to pay for water you don’t use?

As I’m sure you know, there are even water-saving appliances you can install in your home. Using a water-saving showerhead can save you 45 gallons out the average 260 gallons of water used daily by a family of four. Weekly, this could mean saving up to 500 gallons a week.  Running your dishwasher and washing machine only when they are filled can save 1,000 gallons a month. A water-saving model when replacing a washing machine can save up to 20 gallons of water per load in comparison to a non-water saving model. An eco-friendly toilet could save you 50-80 gallons of water a day. Finding these appliances is easy, as they are available in every home appliance and improvement store all over Lebanon. These changes will allow you to save substantially; indeed, you could easily cut your water bill in half by being environmentally friendly.

So come on, Lebanon. Let’s do it. Let’s think of the environment, our future, and our bills, and conserve water. We can do it, Lebanon!!!

 

 

 

Hello, Lebanon. It’s me, your friendly Green Patriot. If you have been watching the news, then you have been seeing what I’m seeing…campaigns on the news pertaining to littering and water conservation. First off, I would like to say that this is AWESOME. This is a new initiative in Lebanon and I’m thrilled that it’s happening.

Pertaining to littering, the first is one that shows some of our beautiful natural sites, such as the Raouche, certain mountains, etc., turning into heaps of garbage. The second is a man who litters, he responds “shu, wi2fit aandeh?” (so, it stops with me?) whenever someone addresses him or asks to stop until someone throws a banana peel on his windshield and he realizes the inapppropriateness of his actions.

The one pertaining to water conservation is a little different. It shows cracked soil, and at first we think we hear a sheep baah-ing, until we realize it is a man on all fours asking for water. At the end, we are asked to conserve water.

The first advertisement indicates that littering is a big problem in Lebanon, and conveys that we should throw our trash in the garbage bin, which is great. However, I would like to add that plastic, paper, aluminum, and glass can be recycled. These recycling bins are all over Beirut.

As for the second pertaining to water conservation; there are many ways as to HOW to conserve water. There are many ways to do so, even at home.

First is an old but valuable tip; monitor personal use. For example, turn off the water when you are not using it. For example, turn off the tap while brushing your teeth. While shaving, fill up the sink with a few inches of water to rinse off the blade, instead of keeping the faucet running.  When washing the dishes, don’t keep the water running while scrubbing; run the water only when you are rinsing the dishes. Take short showers, rather than 30-minute ones.

In terms of household utilities and appliances, there are many that conserve both water and money! For example, there are environmentally friendly toilets (we’ve seen them, the type with two flush buttons) and low-flow faucets which are readily available and will save you money and resources. If you have a dishwasher, make sure to only run full loads to make good use of your water. The same goes for laundry machines. Make sure you don’t have any leaky faucets or toilets, etc.

Lastly, there is the idea of rain harvesting. Although I have written about this before, I would like to bring this up again. Rain harvesting is an inexpensive way to capture the rain Lebanon bestows upon us, clean it, and put it to good use. For more on this (including a diagram as to how rain harvesting works) please follow this link: https://keeplebanongreen.wordpress.com/2011/07/27/lebanon-water-conservation/

Yes, it’s my own link 😀

Anyway, great initiative! Lebanon, our country deserves to be rehabilitated, and we deserve to live in a clean environment. We can do it, Lebanon!!!

Hello, my fellow Lebanese. It’s me, your friendly Green Patriot. Did any of you see the television commercial yesterday on conserving water? It’s true, we do need to conserve water. Luckily for us, as a country that has rain, we can do that.

Rain harvesting allows us to accumulate, treat,  and store rainwater for reuse. This method has been used to provide drinking water, water for livestock, water for irrigation, as well for menial things such as cleaning, etc. Although it needs to be treated before use, it can supplement groundwater in this fashion, and make a large difference in the amount of usable water available to us.

This is done in a very basic manner. Rainwater is collected from the roofs of buildings, and it runs through a basic system that cleans it and makes it appropriate for use. Household rainfall catchment systems are appropriate in areas with an average rainfall greater than 200 mm (7.9 in) per year. Lebanon is one such country. A typical rainwater harvesting system meant to supplement groundwater looks like this:

File:Simple Diagram to show Rainwater Harvesting.png

There are other rain harvesting structures that do not flow into the soil if the water is meant for other purposes (cleaning, etc.) Designing a rain harvesting structure is based on your needs!

At present, out of our 8 billion six hundred thousand cubic meters of rain, only one billion is being used. Lebanon, we have the potential to use our rainwater to our advantage! This system is inexpensive to implement, and would save us both money and resources, regardless as to whether or not we implement it in our homes, in our water companies, or on public level by the government. We have the technology and the rainwater potential to do so. We can do it, Lebanon!